The Restaurant at the Getty: A Mountaintop Gem

I’m a total museum geek. I’m also a huge foodie. When the two mix, I’m pretty much in heaven no matter what. But when I went to The Restaurant at the Getty Museum during my stay in Los Angeles, I was completely blown away. I ate there with my best friend and my grandma, and the three of us immediately fell in love with this peaceful yet playful foodie paradise on a mountaintop.

What kind of restaurant is it? What’s the price point? 

The Restaurant serves modern American cuisine at moderate prices. If you want to eat at the Getty but don’t want to splurge on a meal, there are also several other cafes and dining carts all over the grounds. But, spoiler alert, The Restaurant is totally worth it.

How’s it look? Describe the restaurant’s aesthetic, any notable features, etc. First impressions.

For those who have never been to the Getty, it’s high up in the mountains. You actually have to take a short tram ride uphill to get to the museum. There are gorgeous views of Los Angeles no matter where you are on the museum grounds, but the views from The Restaurant are some of the best. The designers definitely took note of that and ensured that wherever you sit in the dining room, you can see the stunning landscape right from your table.

Like the rest of the museum, The Restaurant was primarily white and totally immaculate, but decals on the walls and small succulents at each table lent the space fun pops of color that made the whole space seem more fun. I honestly could have sat in the restaurant all day, enjoying the food, the views, and the light classical music playing in the background for hours.

DSCN1462
Continue reading…

8 Quick Reads for a Long Flight

August will be a travel-heavy month for From Ship to Shore. We’ll be bringing you articles, reviews, and pictures from Los Angeles and Scottsdale, meaning there’s going to be lots of flying involved. So, it’s time to plan ahead for some ways to pass the wifi-less time on all those planes.

While a 7-hour plane ride might sound like the perfect time to get cracking on that huge, classic tome that you feel obligated to read (I’m lookin’ at you, War and Peace), let’s face it: flying can be pretty exhausting and uncomfortable, leaving you with little will to cuddle up with lengthy Russian existentialism. Instead, quick reads are sure to pass the time and be the perfect, relaxing way to spend a few hours.

Whether you’re prepping for a long flight, a beach week, or just want some new books, here’s a few amazing options:

1. Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns) by Mindy Kaling
I just finished this book and it’s hilarious. Mindy Kaling, creator of The Mindy Project and Kelly Kapoor on The Office, has such a quirky, engaging voice. She offers some crazy stories about growing up, writing and producing The Office, and even her short stint at SNL.

2. The Alchemist by Paolo Coehlo
This book is short and sweet, not to mention perfect for travelers. It follows a shepherd boy as he travels around the world in search of treasure, teaching valuable moral lessons along the way. It’s a modern fable and will surely be considered a classic in the future.

3. Where’d You Go, Bernadette? by Maria Semple
Semple’s novel is genuinely funny. 15-year-old Bee must set out to find her mother, an agoraphobic genius who runs away before the family leaves for a vacation in Antarctica. And this is all coming from a writer who’s penned several episodes of Arrested Development, which pretty much says it all.

4. Bossypants by Tina Fey
This is an autobiographical and comedic masterpiece. To me, Tina Fey can do no wrong (I mean, look at Mean Girls and 30 Rock). This book will only take a couple of hours to get through, and each page is enjoyable and brutally honest. Just read it!

5. Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri
While this is definitely a more serious book than the past four, tackling issues like cultural assimilation and struggling relationships, its short story format makes it fast-paced and always engaging. Lahiri, a Pulitzer Prize-winner, really is one of the greatest writers of our time: her stories are thoughtful and, despite their short length, leave a big impression on her readers.

Continue reading…

Sitting Down with Nevin Martell, Author of Travel Memoir “Freak Show Without a Tent”

Nevin Martell Courtesy of Photographer Scott Suchman

Nevin Martell, courtesy of photographer Scott Suchman

 

From Ship to Shore‘s Hannah Josi recently sat down with Freak Show Without a Tent: Swimming with Piranhas, Getting Stoned in Fiji and Other Family Vacations author and prolific D.C. food writer Nevin Martell to talk crazy travel adventures, D.C. food culture, and writing tips.

HJ: Thanks for meeting with me. I really, really enjoyed the book. It was wonderful how it wasn’t just a travel book—it was a coming of age story…Now, you end your book when you’re in your 30s with your dad, but in the chapter before that, you were seventeen. So, in the space in between, what were you up to? You mentioned a couple of trips—did your travel continue into your twenties or did it kind of fall to the wayside?

NM: When I went to college and then moved to New York City I had, at first, fewer chances to travel but that was just because I was a broke kid out of college with his first job trying to make his way in the world. It kind of picked up steam, though, as I got a little bit older in my mid- to later-twenties. I went to Cuba with my father and my sister, and I got a chance to go to Finland, and I had a chance to go to Costa Rica a couple times, and I had a chance to go to Mexico a couple of times. I tried to travel somewhere new internationally at least once, about twice, a year. That was kind of my goal, and, you know, for the most part I was able to follow that philosophy…

My wife and I, when we first got engaged, we ended up in Honduras, in the Bay Islands, and we tried to travel a lot, up until we had our child a year and a half ago—you know, we’re waiting to take our first big trip with him. He’s been to California a couple times, he’s been all over the East Coast, but we’re just gearing up for the right international opportunity. But, um, no, in the in-between years, I would say my love of travel grew and, you know, I was always just looking for the best way to make that happen and the most feasible way…

Now that I’m in this new stage as a father, it was interesting writing the book because I look at the way my family traveled as a kid, and then think like, “Okay, how do I want to do this with my own child and wife, and where would that take us, and would we go to some of the same places that my dad took my family? And, if so, would we do the same things?” Probably not, but how could we do them in the right way for us? So travel is something that’s been super important, and it’s something that I can’t wait to introduce my son to, because travel was always something amazing for me, and I think he’ll really appreciate it, too. I definitely think it’s important for forming a world view.

HJ: So once your son does grow up a little bit and he is able to travel more, do you think that you’ll kind of go the route of your father and try to go to these really exotic, authentic, crazy places—for those who haven’t read the book, Nevin’s been to Fiji, Venezuela…all over. Do you think you’ll go that route or are you going to play more by the book?

NM: I think it’s going to be somewhere in the middle. I’m certainly not going to be a pre-packaged, Club Med kind of guy, ever. You know, that doesn’t really have any appeal for me…But by the same token, do I necessarily want to take my son fishing for piranhas and things like that? Maybe not. I would love to show him some of the far corners of the world, and I would love to introduce him to some really lesser-known elements of the world, but I want to do it in a way that—no offense to my dad—is a slightly saner way to doing it.

For example, top of the bucket list are like Morocco—I would love to do that. But really top of the bucket list is my wife’s home country Ghana, which I haven’t visited either. So, I would love to take him there, introduce him to his relatives…spend some time in West Africa. But then I would like to do some crazy things, like…since I was a little kid I always wanted to go to Stonehenge, for example. I think that would be something fun. I’ve always wanted to go to Easter Island, which I know is not the most practical of destinations because it’s literally the most remote point on Earth, but I think, again, it’s something he would really enjoy. I think it’s going to be somewhere in the middle, probably closer to my dad than I’m probably thinking, but as I say in the book, more airbags, more seat belts, more helmets.

download

HJ: When it comes to actually going out there, finding the right spot to vacation, finding that nice balance between authentic but visitor-friendly, do you have any advice?
Continue reading…

Looking Back at Arles, Van Gogh’s New Home

My trip to France was the biggest fourteenth birthday present I could ever imagine. My dad and I went on a 7-day whirlwind tour of Paris and pretty much all the major cities in Provence, plus an unexpected layover in London that left me yearning to return for a proper visit.

Paris was cool, Nice was incredible, but what really stuck out was Arles, a medium-sized city in Provence. The town is rich with history and an old-world feel. A large Roman amphitheater and obelisk remind visitors of its Roman past. Boulangeries and small French bistros lining the winding stone streets make it seem like a storybook. For a town like that, it comes with no surprise that it has been a major destination for artists, most notably Van Gogh, Gauguin, and Picasso.

Arlesamphi

My dad had long been obsessed with Van Gogh, so much of our time in Arles was spent retracing his steps. While many of the most famous landmarks in his paintings were destroyed during World War II, we stopped by the recreation of the yellow awning from Café Terrace at Night and the vacant lot where the apartment he shared with Gauguin once stood. We walked along the Rhone River, which might sound familiar thanks to the beautiful Starry Night Over the Rhone (although it’s not the Starry Night), and visited the small center dedicated to his life in the town.

030

When we got to the aforementioned center, we were expecting to see a Van Gogh painting or two—it was, after all, a space dedicated to his life and his work in France, and it only seemed natural for a painting to be there to represent such an important, penultimate phase in his career (just a year after he left Arles, he committed suicide). But there was nothing.

Continue reading…